Speeding Up Time for Bill Simmons

Bill Simmons declares the following in the May 21st issue of ESPN the Magazine: Fifty years from now, some stat geek will crunch numbers from Duncan’s era and come to the conclusion that Kevin Garnett was just as good. And he’ll be wrong. No NBA team that featured a healthy …

Almost Back

Okay, I am almost back to posting on a semi-daily basis. Tomorrow I plan on posting a comment that I have tentatively titled “Speeding Up Time for Bill Simmons.” But today is not tomorrow, so I thought I would quickly update the WOW Journal with one more comment on the …

Baseball’s Arms Race and the Prisoner’s Dilemma

By very popular demand, guest blogger Steve Walters is back.  As noted before, Steve teaches economics at Loyola College in Maryland but remains a fan of his hometown Red Sox, Celtics, Patriots, and Bruins. Today he provides insights into the Clemens deal that you will not find anywhere else. Imagine …

Ian Ayres comments on Price-Wolfers

For those who cannot get enough of the Price-Wolfers (or is it Wolfers-Price?) story, Ian Ayres has posted a great comment entitled: Michael Jordan and the NBA refs.  Not only does he offer more explanation of the Implicit Association Test (IAT), but also provides background on the role the “experts” …

For the Love of the Game — WOW edition

Steve Walters is busy grading and I am still working. But I don’t want the Wages of Wins Journal to remain un-updated (is that a word?) for too long. Originally I intended the following to be a Keeping Score column for the New York Times. But as you will see, …

More on the Price-Wolfers Study

Jonathan Weiler – of the Starting Five, and formerly of Sports Media Review – asked me to comment on a column by John Hollinger (insider blog).   Hollinger looked at the Price-Wolfers study – entitled “Racial Discrimination Among NBA Referees” – and noted that the size of the effect, according to …

Implicit Bias in the NBA

If sports didn’t exist, sports would have to be invented by social scientists. Research in the social sciences is difficult since we do not often have data on worker productivity or data generated in a controlled environment. In sports, we have an abundance of data on worker productivity and the …

The Short Demand for Short People

By popular demand (and this is clear when we look at the popularity of his posts) guest blogger Steve Walters is back. For those of you with extremely short memories, Steve teaches economics at Loyola College in Maryland but remains a fan of his hometown Red Sox, Celtics, Patriots, and …