Maybe it is McGrady?

The response to yesterday’s comment on Dikembe Mutombo has centered on the value of Tracy McGrady. People have noted that McGrady came back from injury just when Yao Ming was injured. So maybe it was McGrady that allowed the Rockets to stay afloat without Yao (or Ming, or Yao Ming …

The Surprising Mount Mutombo

On December 23rd Yao Ming fractured his leg. As a result, he missed the next 32 games. One would expect that losing a center that John Hollinger has named as the most likely current big man to be listed someday as one of the top ten centers of all time …

Ranking the NBA Again

The Chicago Bulls in 1995-96 won 72 games, finishing with a winning percentage of 0.878. This mark currently ranks as the best regular season in history, surpassing the Los Angeles Lakers who finished the 1971-72 season with 69 victories (and a 0.841 winning percentage). After 60 games the Dallas Mavericks …

Creating Shots in Philadelphia

Scoring is king in the NBA. At least, as we argue in The Wages of Wins, scoring is the primary factor behind what a player gets paid and who wins post-season awards. But when we look at Wins Produced we often see scorers, especially inefficient scorers, ranked lower than the …

Yglesias Comments on the Iverson Trade

Normally I don’t offer posts consisting primarily of quotes taken from other places. Today, though, I thought I would make an exception. Let me begin by noting that yesterday I commented on the early returns on the Iverson trade from Denver’s perspective (I will look at the 76ers on Monday). …

Early Returns on Iverson and Anthony

The big trade this season was the trade that brought “The Answer” to the Denver Nuggets. The joining of Iverson and Carmelo Anthony – two of the game’s most prolific scorers – led John Hollinger to argue that the Nuggets were set to contend for an NBA title in 2007. …

Darko Starts

In 1997 the Detroit Pistons traded Otis Thorpe to the Vancouver Grizzlies for a conditional first round draft choice. Thorpe had been an above average power forward for thirteen consecutive seasons. But after the trade, he played four more seasons (with five different teams) and was never above average again. …

Glad to be Wrong

I was born in Detroit. Although my family left the Motor City in 1981 (and I have not visited since 1990), I remain a Pistons fan. Consequently, when Ben Wallace departed for Chicago this past summer I was not happy (which I noted at the time). Given Big Ben’s productivity …